Monthly Archives: October 2011

The LORD’s Word to Priests and People through the Prophet Malachi

This Sunday’s first reading from the prophet Malachi contains a sharp rebuke of priests for causing “many to falter by [their] instruction.”  If we read the context, we discover that the problem was with the whole people, not only with the priests, and that the crisis Israel faced bears many similarities to that which the Church is facing today. Continue reading

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Reflecting on the Gospel for the Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time

From The Gospel of Matthew by Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri, commenting on Matthew 23:1-12:

Chapter 23 is the grand finale to the conflict between Jesus and the Jewish leaders in Matthew, only now debate gives way to denunciation as Jesus charges the scribes and Pharisees with hypocrisy and infidelity to their own religious heritage. The severity of the language, consistent with the practice of Israel’s prophets, underscores the seriousness with which Jesus treats wrongdoing committed in the name of religion. The chapter is not only an exposé of corruption among Israel’s teachers but is also a warning to Christian leaders of the pitfalls to be avoided in pastoral ministry.

© 2010 Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri and Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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What Is Our Lord Saying to American Catholics?

America is going through hard times economically, socially, and politically.  Does Jesus have a message for Christians in America?  And if so, what is it?  The best place to look is the word of God. Continue reading

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Reflecting on the Gospel for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

From The Gospel of Matthew by Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri, commenting on Matthew 22:40:

Jesus adds that the whole law and the prophets depend on these two commandments. Literally, the text says that the Torah and the Prophets “hang” on the double love commandment, as though these two precepts support the full weight of biblical religion in all of its various aspects. No other commandment of the Bible is properly observed if either one of these is transgressed or compromised. For the aim of all divine Scripture is to bring us out of ourselves to love and serve God and our fellow human beings.

© 2010 Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri and Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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Reflecting on the Gospel for the Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

From The Gospel of Matthew by Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri, commenting on Matthew 22:15-16:

The evangelist informs us that the Pharisees are up to no good. They are devising a trap to ensnare Jesus in his speech. This time they team up with the Herodians, who are political supporters of the Herodian dynasty and its cooperative relationship with Rome. To put it mildly, these two groups are neither friends nor allies of each other. The Pharisees are religious patriots, bitterly opposed to Roman rule, whereas the Herodians are content to work together with the Gentile powers that be. The present alliance is made solely for the purpose of bringing down the Messiah.

© 2010 Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri and Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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Let’s Fast for Life!

This morning reading Scripture gave me the strength I needed to begin a fast for the remaining 40 Days for Life (check out their inspiring website).

I have been reading through the prophets and am now in Daniel.  Today I read Dan 10, which begins like this:

In those days I, Daniel, was mourning for three weeks. I ate no delicacies, no meat or wine entered my mouth, nor did I anoint myself at all, for the full three weeks. (Dan 10:2-3)

Daniel was “mourning” (the NJB says “doing a three-week penance”) because the attempts to rebuild the temple and the city of Jerusalem after the exile were stalled due to intense opposition (see Ezra 4:1-4).  Daniel, however, was not merely grieving over the situation, but was appealing to the Lord to act.

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Reflecting on the Gospel for the Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

From The Gospel of Matthew by Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri, commenting on Matthew 22:14:

The final verse captures the message of the parable in a short maxim. Many are invited, Jesus says, but few are chosen. The point is that all are called to the kingdom, but not all will be found worthy to possess it. Some will decline the invitation and so exclude themselves from its blessings; others will accept it but will not follow through in putting its demands into practice. Those found acceptable are those committed to directing their lives by the gospel. They clothe themselves in the garments of true repentance and Christ-like righteousness.

© 2010 Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri and Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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