Monthly Archives: December 2011

Reflecting on the Gospel for the Solemnity of the Nativity of the Lord (Christmas)

From The Gospel of Matthew by Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri, reflecting on Matthew 1:1:

In this opening verse, Matthew introduces us to the holy name of Jesus, which has been invoked in prayer from the very beginning of Christianity. From a biblical perspective, the very fact that we can call on the name of Jesus is astonishing. In ancient Judaism, God’s name came to be invoked only once a year and only by the High Priest. Now, with God becoming man in Christ, we have the privilege of calling on the name of the Lord. “The divine name may not be spoken by human lips, but by assuming our humanity The Word of God hands it over to us and we can invoke it: ‘Jesus,’ ‘YHWH saves’” (Catechism 2666).

© 2010 Curtis Mitch and Edward Sri and Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

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Filed under Curtis Mitch, Edward Sri, From the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture, Lectionary, The Gospel of Matthew

What Does The First Pope’s First Encyclical Say to Catholics Today?

Peter originally wrote First Peter as a circular letter (which is what “encyclical” means) to a group of churches in Asia Minor in the first century. Their world passed away long ago, but this bright yet sober letter continues to speak to us as the living word of God twenty centuries later. First Peter speaks to us in at least four distinct ways. Continue reading

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Filed under biblical interpretation, biblical theology, Daniel Keating, First and Second Peter, Jude, Uncategorized

Reflecting on the Gospel for the Second Sunday of Advent

From The Gospel of Mark by Mary Healy, commenting on Mark 1:1-8:

In the original passages [of Isaiah] God was speaking to his people, but Mark has reworked them to portray God speaking to his Son, telling him, Your coming will be prepared by a forerunner, John the Baptist.  Thus the Lord whose way is prepared is Jesus!  His paths will be made straight—that is, the people’s hearts will be made ready for his coming—by the contrition for sin and the repentance that come about through John’s preaching.  Mark is saying, in effect, “Israel, here is your God!  God’s promises are being fulfilled, and a new and greater return from exile is about to take place!”

© 2008 Mary Healy and Baker Academic. Unauthorized use of this material without express written permission is strictly prohibited.

 

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Filed under From the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture, Lectionary, Mary Healy, The Gospel of Mark